Archive for March, 2010

Late summer

March 24, 2010

What an interesting season it has been.

I know everyone is gearing up for autumn, however all this humidity we’ve been having points to what is sometimes referred to as a ‘Late Summer’. It has certainly been playing havoc with some of the late harvesting produce. We are finally getting eggplants however, and the capsicum are finally fruiting.

I’ve been busy cutting stuff back in order to reveal some of the beds to the shortening sun, but also to create some solid matter for the compost.

Our beds have suffered considerably however with a terrible delivery of soil we received back in spring. It was allegedly meant to be thick, rich, humus, compost material – instead it turned out to be thin, lifeless, and incredibly hydrophobic. Watering now involves the water running across the compacted soil and spilling into the pathways. I would like to reveal where we got it from, but then that could be considered libel/slander. I certainly won’t recommend buying soil from these suppliers ever again.

So it looks like this winter may need to involve healing the beds and nourishing them back to rich life over the winter. Perhaps some sowing of winter manure crops, and layering of different materials, such as Lucerne, Sugar cane mulch, pea straw, compost, worm castings, and so on.

The beans are still going, and I’m leaving them to dry out. The Borlottis were the most successful of all the varieties.

The Jerusalem Artichokes are almost ready to start harvesting – I just wish the weather was cooler to enjoy rich soup. But perhaps we’ll be able to feast on it over the Easter break.

I picked the parsnips, and most of them were woody, as they really needed to be harvested a lot earlier. I used the smaller sweeter ones in a 5 Root soup (courtesy of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s River Cottage Everyday cook book), and they were yummy.

Zucchinis are still going. The Gojis are finally fruiting. Pumpkins are swelling. And excitingly there are a couple of Chinese Bottle Gourds coming along nicely.

I’ll get the camera out and take some piccys……. coming soon.

As easy as 1 2 3

March 22, 2010

This is the simplest way to create a functional, attractive food garden.

If I ever build myself a new garden, this is what I will use, these gorgeous crates from The Little Veggie Patch Co.

Within minutes you can turn an ugly corner into a productive garden. It just takes a few simple steps.

Step 1. Call the wonderful people at The Little Veggie Patch Co. and order your crates. They can deliver to the exact spot.

Step 2. Place an old piece of shade cloth, weed matting or similar on bottom of the crates, the sides are already lined for you.

Step 3. Add two whole bales of straw, add compost or soil, put in your plants, water. DONE!

How easy was that 🙂